Rabindranath Tagore and his Poetry


A small child, perhaps 11 years old, travels with his father to the remotest area of his vast country. This is the first time the tween has travelled alone with his father outside of his familiar surroundings.Everything is novel to him; the boy speaks a language that has a hidden message for the world; he possesses a mind that is silent but seeks the grandeur of his land's history in order to create a brighter tomorrow. He embarks on a pilgrimage to Amritsar, Punjab, and encounters the Gurubani, the voice of unity. He is conscientious of the chanting, and the musical sounds introduce him to the civilization of humanity. The words of the Upanishads provided him with access to the ancient past's treasures. Furthermore, the tween's voyage to the Himalayas is related to the history of the cultural heights of this nation. Thus, the tween develops into a man who is not only a poet, singer, statesman, or noble laureate, but also a humanist whose every function benefits the planet and humanity. Indeed, this is Rabindranath Tagore.


Rabindranath Tagore's ideas cannot be summed up in a lyrical symbol; doing so would be disrespectful to the great seer whose ideas affected the world of his time. While we are bound by nature to categorise the person in front of us, doing so with Tagore would be tantamount to a crime, as he was a seer—an institutive seer. Sri Aurobindo describes Tagore's contribution as one in which the entire Bengal sought ideas, emotions, and culture through him at the time. While Bankim Chandra's work was already embedded in the minds of people shaping the country at the time, Tagore's publications and writings were oriented toward the present and future, and possibly beyond.


Tagore and his poetry


Rabindranath Tagore was well aware that any effort he accomplished during his lifetime had to be capable of uniting everything that existed. He was thoroughly mindful that he needed to express the truth through his spiritual essence, not his creative talent. Through his sadhana, Tagore discovered the merging energies and elevated the words that became poems. Tagore was born in a place where Vaishanav poetry had traditionally enabled the expression of the human spirit. As a result, Tagore absorbed the happiness and creativity of Vaishanav poetry as a result of his spiritual inclination. This was Tagore's legacy. It is not hyperbole to describe Tagore as a seer descended from the heritage of Vedic Rishis who used poetry to impart their spiritual and human experiences.


"The poetry of Tagore owes its sudden and universal success to this advantage that he gives us more of this discovery and fusion for which the mind of our age is in quest than any other creative writer of the time. His work is a constant music of the overpassing of the borders, a chant-filled realm in which the subtle sounds and lights of the truth of the spirit give new meanings to the finer subtleties of life."
Sri Aurobidno

Tagore's, Poetry was not exclusive to the Indian sentiment, but appealed to all humans. Tagore was ultimately writing for the world, inviting everyone to experience the interconnectedness of their own lives through his poetry. If Tagore's poems had merit or worldwide appeal, it was because they were persistent melodic chants with delicate sound and lights of truth seeking new meaning in the early twentieth century's nuances. Sri Aurobindo describes this in his language as: "The poetry of Tagore owes its sudden and universal success to this advantage that he gives us more of this discovery and fusion for which the mind of our age is in quest than any other creative writer of the time. His work is a constant music of the overpassing of the borders, a chant-filled realm in which the subtle sounds and lights of the truth of the spirit give new meanings to the finer subtleties of life."


While Tagore was reestablishing the ancient truth of poetry, he was chastised for introducing the reader to philosophy and taking them to another cosmos. This was precisely what Rabindranath intended to accomplish by translating world knowledge into self-knowledge. The world owes a debt to Tagore that we have yet to repay, for it was he in the twentieth century who drove us forward, made us aware of our own selves, and compelled us to reveal ourselves through the conveyance of poetry. Tagore's poetry helped people become more spiritual through the poetic expression of something that was made.